The Latest

wocinsolidarity:

bana05:


Rutina Wesley looking at Gina Torres the way we all feel about Gina Torres.

You can see the stars in her eyes. That is the only way to gaze upon Gina Torres.

Why is this post so adorable and accurate though 
Aug 21, 2014 / 11,301 notes

wocinsolidarity:

bana05:

Rutina Wesley looking at Gina Torres the way we all feel about Gina Torres.

You can see the stars in her eyes. That is the only way to gaze upon Gina Torres.

Why is this post so adorable and accurate though 

(via mourningoberyn)

petite-prep:

stationary
Aug 20, 2014 / 374 notes

petite-prep:

stationary

(via eunice-bee)

"talking" about racism makes you uncomfortable…how do you think "living" with racism feels?
Aug 20, 2014 / 2,945 notes
theschoolgirlsnotebook:

Cohen’s kitchen.
Aug 20, 2014 / 1,362 notes

theschoolgirlsnotebook:

Cohen’s kitchen.

(via prep-tacular)

Aug 20, 2014 / 22,072 notes

suammetuit:

art meme: spring and winter in paris

“If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast.” ― Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast

(via jessicaaplummer)

Aug 20, 2014 / 536 notes
Aug 20, 2014 / 82 notes

makeupbag:

So, I just created a new YouTube channel for beauty and fashion, because I don’t think there are enough African-American beauty gurus.  I really like your blog, and I’d like to know if you would be willing to help me get the word out about my video and help me get subscriptions from people. There will be new videos every Thursday. Thanks for your time! 

toreyxo

There are many Black beauty vloggers/bloggers/ gurus of various shades, but it is also great to add more.

Aug 20, 2014 / 257,955 notes
Aug 20, 2014 / 2,322 notes
Aug 20, 2014 / 1,104 notes

(via preppinit)

You never lose by loving. You only lose by holding back.
Aug 20, 2014 / 489 notes
Aug 20, 2014 / 964 notes

(via preppinit)

Aug 20, 2014 / 5,139 notes

(via preppinit)

schomburgcenter:

Gail Fisher, who broke many racial barriers for black women on American television, was born August 18, 1935. Her mother raised her and her siblings with her own hair styling business in Edison, New Jersey. During her teenage years, Fisher had showed an interest in entertainment through her participation in various beauty contests, acting in her High School’s plays and as a cheerleader. Fisher studied acting at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, after winning a contest sponsored by Coca-Cola, and later became a member of the Repertory Theater at Lincoln Center. She did many television commercials and declared herself “the first black female— no, make that black, period— to make a national TV commercial, on camera, with lines.” Her most well known and one of the first major roles for black women was as the secretary “Peggy Fair” on the show Mannix from 1968 until 1975. Fisher, pictured with Mark Stewart, as her son in Mannix (1970), won two Golden Globes and an Emmy Award  for the role. She was the first black woman to win an Emmy Award. 
Aug 20, 2014 / 87 notes

schomburgcenter:

Gail Fisher, who broke many racial barriers for black women on American television, was born August 18, 1935. Her mother raised her and her siblings with her own hair styling business in Edison, New Jersey. During her teenage years, Fisher had showed an interest in entertainment through her participation in various beauty contests, acting in her High School’s plays and as a cheerleader. Fisher studied acting at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, after winning a contest sponsored by Coca-Cola, and later became a member of the Repertory Theater at Lincoln Center. She did many television commercials and declared herself “the first black female— no, make that black, period— to make a national TV commercial, on camera, with lines.” Her most well known and one of the first major roles for black women was as the secretary “Peggy Fair” on the show Mannix from 1968 until 1975. Fisher, pictured with Mark Stewart, as her son in Mannix (1970), won two Golden Globes and an Emmy Award  for the role. She was the first black woman to win an Emmy Award. 

(via classicladiesofcolor)

Aug 20, 2014 / 1,024 notes